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by government through fiscal policy was the real blow-up risk. so if you think of a couple places in the world that we were the most afraid of like europe, i think the actions of the ecb to at least defer the problems with the sovereigns and the bank issues in europe, if they use this time to fix the problems, we'll look back and think it's a good thing. if they deferred them, made them worse in the long term, we won't feel that way. i think something similar has happened in the united states whereby a lot of liquidity has been provided by the central bank. >> andrew, you have operations throughout all of the world. what's your sense of growth? there are troubling reports about growth slowing down which so far have been a very powerful lifeline for global growth as united states and europe weakened, particularly china where you do a lot of business. >> i don't think we're going have an '08/'09 scenario out there for the reasons lloyd was addressed. i do think the world since '08/'09 to now has not gotten to normal. of course, the obvious, which is consumption in the u.s., is not where it was.
, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking a
good luck. god bless. [applause] . . the turning point. a change debate. the role of government, free-market, future trajectory of our nation. in that debate to campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bites, the reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the midst of all of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restor
lose 35 jobs when it shuts down. you lose jobs let schools and at local government. that is the real cost of what his policies are bringing out by supporting bureaucrats in washington. one neighbor at a time, you've got two avenues to take. one is a government solution of believes government can bring you a job. and me, who believes we can revitalize and reenergize and renew the enthusiasm for montana if we can get government out of the way in our regulatory policy and in our industries. it is not just the businesses that will turn things around. it is those who will -- to work for those businesses who will help to create better opportunities for ourselves, our children, our businesses. i look people in the eye as i travel a run montana and i do not see statistics. we do not necessarily want to talk about the unemployment rate statewide. there are 56 counties with 56 cultures and histories and their own desire for their own future. and in liberty county and might be agriculture. in lincoln county might be timber. in eastern montana it might be oil and gas and coal. i want to get gove
a number of years in the spanish government from 1977 to 82. he was an active participant in the negotiations for spanish entry to what is now the european union, the european economic community. he also participated in a number of spanish negotiation then they got, not wto and with the european union and spain a century into the union after democracy was restored in spain and spain was welcomed into the european community process. in the last year at this government coming was minister of the presidency, played a very essential role in the entire spanish government situation. shortly after he joined banco santander and has now been there for over 20 years. he is now vice-chairman of the bank, member of the board, also member of the board of banesto, banco santander in portugal, a member of the board of a number of other financial companies in the group and is president of the print of the foundation and spain. i think we are uniquely privileged data to have a speaker from banco santander with its unique ability to see both the spanish situation, the overall banking situat
enduring presence will be, and we're working on that right now both internal to our government, but also with our nato allies. so we're trying to determine based on the agreements made in lisbon and then reinforced in chicago about what this long-term commitment will be, and it's scoped against several missions, one of which is counterterror, another of which is continuing to train and advise at some level. another is to enable other agencies of government to do their job in afghanistan. and so as we determine how to, what we'll need to accomplish those missions based on the growth of the afghan security forces, sometime early in 2013 we'll come up with a number that will define our enduring presence. and then we'll take what we have there now, which is 68,000 u.s. and about 30, 34,000 coalition partners, and we'll establish a glide slope to get from where we are to where we're going to be. and the important point is that in that question is i want to reinforce that our objectives remain both sound and achievable. as for the insider threat, as i mentioned in my prepared remarks, the insi
. and of course our government is sparing no effort in tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused, as we must, on what more needs to be done right now to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employees at our embassy in sanaa and we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this attack and to bring those responsible to justice as well. but throughout all of this, we must not only focus on the headlines, we have to keep in mind the trend lines. we have to remain focused on the broader strategic question posed by these democratic transitions and their impact on american interests and values. let me start by stating the obvious. nobody should have ever thought this would be an easy road. i certainly didn't. however, it is important to look at the full picture, to weigh the violent acts of a small number of extremists against the aspirations and actions of the region's people and government. that broader view supports, rather than discredits, the promise of the
government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cagae. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son syan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is the kind of attitude i will take to the united states senate. my opponent have a great rÉsume a. but a great resonate is not a plan. he has been running for a year now and we do not know where he stands on the major issues of the day. we have a choice in this election. we can elect somebody who does not h
hollywood, big government, big journalism, and big peace, p, e, a, c, e. he became a big player what is come to be called the new media including work as editor on "the drudge report" website and yes the "huffington post". bull buckley didn't dwell in the past but he believed we should and could learn from it. he was fascinated by the rise of the new media and encouraged conservatives to become involved in it as he had in the old media. he didn't live to see it come to full fruition and andrew left us too soon for him to become a greater influence than he already has. a tribute to him that his web sites and work endure. it is my pleasure as the winner of last year's william f. buckley, jr., award to present this year's award posthumously to andrew breitbart. may he rest in peace. [applause] may he rest in peace and may his legacy live on. accepting the award is oars son dean, susie's father and with him is alley mills dean. ♪ . >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. you may remember me. i formally went on the screen, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some fr
at the washington post before i escaped the belt way with my florida girl. government is not a new topic for me. i did not think i could have written this book if i still lived in washington. the group think is too strong and it is almost impossible to overstate the power of the conventional wisdom that the stimulus was a ludicrous failure and totally uncool to talk about it without ruling rise and making ironic comments. you totally stimulated the economy when you gave that panhandler at a dollar. even obama joked after his annual thanksgiving pardon that he saved or created four turkeys. my friends here know that i have a contrarian streak. i don't do groupthink. the guy who visited gulf after the bp spill and rode the environmental damage was being overstated, i was right. i had data. arguing that the stimulus was a new new deal was not just considered contrarian but delusional. like arguing the bp spill didn't happen. we can discuss why. a combination of relentless republican distortion, incompetent white house communication, brain dead media coverage, the unfortunate timing of the jobs bill t
make it seem as though that when you talk about limits on the national government, that's antithetical to the constitution, the existence of a national government. it's embeddedded in the original argument. it argument was about limits. it wasn't about -- you hear this kind of and all these people trying to push us back to the article. that's ludicrous. and that's -- but helped to develop the constitution. .. the same time you understand there are some people still fighting the debate that engage in that debate and subsequent to that even in the adoption of 13th and 14th and 15th amendments you still have so we are still talking about what are the amendments of the national guard? what is the role of the national government, how we protect individual rights and liberties etc.. >> what's move forward and start talking about the events that press the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. i want our audience, everybody on c-span it isn't just -- it is a special anniversary, it isn't just a to enter the 25th anniversary of the year that changes everything in human history, we the people. it's al
on them by the government. >> he estimates the fact that as governor in eliminated the estate tax and took more than 100,000 low income virginians of the income tax rolls. i just thought i would correct him there. george and i have very different strategies. this is one of the most important programs that has ever been done by the government. more than 50% of american seniors have retired into poverty before it was passed. thank you we have -- thank god we have those days behind us. that would've been a huge catastrophe prior to the collapse in washington. what i would do is allow the payroll tax of words as a way of protecting the solvency of the program. on medicare, george allen supports the ryan budget that would turn medicare into a voucher program and push costs onto the seniors. i propose a senior savings costs, for example ending the prescription -- that we get. that would save us without jeopardize in the benefit of all. >> mr. allen, to ask both of you to take one minute to respond to tim kaine's assocation about medicare and to support the ryan budget? >> what i support is prese
they wish it were more. one caller said i want signal government their options for everybody. there are different reasons. but it is starting to be on an upward tick. host: thank you very much. thank you for being with us. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. back tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. eastern. with more of your questions and answers. we will ticker now to the bipartisan policy center here in washington. >> this is the bipartisan policy center in washington. we are here to bring in a discussion on the center's task force. about the a report call effects of a nuclear iran. charles robb will be speaking. charles robb is at the podium. live coverage on c-span. >>. good morning. thank you for coming. welcome to the roll out of the price of inaction, analysis of energy and economic effects of a nuclear iran. let me begin with an apology if i met. to have a board meeting in chantilly, virginia this morning in which transformational decisions will be made. and i am also and investor, so i have a more than passing interest and will not be able to remain for t
daily sacrifice to protect our government. but the government accountability board said the problem is isolate they have done their best to fix it >> 26 of the 851 local clerks who missed the deadline and we have a number of redundancies in the system. they got it in a timely manner and so they can mark it to get it counted. >> gab said electronic ballots cut transmission time in half and in most cases ballots are delivered . now the responsibility rests with a voters to get the ballot sent in on time . the lieutenant governor who was on "fox and friends" this morning is very worried. >> it is unacceptable that our military men and women, who allow us to sleep peacefully with our little kids at home and at night might be denied the opportunity to choose their next commander-in-chief. >> mitt romney campaign might fall suits elsewhere. nothin is imminent but we are monitoring other states and seriously considering filing a suit in vermont but the department of the justice filed their own suit. but there is only 24 days until the election and not much time to get it settled. >> not mu
to ensure that yes come the government is very much pro-life and that it would support legislation that would restrict abortion. this has all open up a bunch of new questions, some of which make them up at tonighttomorrow night's presidential debate and could come up in the second one. we are following this and we will see where it goes. jenna: it might be interesting if it comes up in the townhall today. we will be watching for that as well. reporter: it could be, maybe someone will bring up. we appreciated it always. you never know really what questions will be asked and it really does show the priority of voters in what questions and issues they want the candidates to address. jon: also interesting to hear what chris christie might say. we are continuing to monitor the next presidential debate. my next guest says that the president's performance in denver forced a major strategy change for the obama party. charlie gasparino joins us live. you are talking about the four letter word liar, right? reporter: everyone across the spectrum, even msnbc determined that barack obama had cl
this can happen if the make of government on november 7 is the same as it is today? >> no. i think will happen for another reason. i think first of all when people figure out there's a big chunk of change, and second of all when you have the debate between the people trying to protect entitlement, and the people trying to kill energy, who are you betting on? >> in california they're saying just allow the winter fuel blend is not early is going to save, make as much as 50 cents a gallon, they've been paying over $5 a gallon in california, and california has created -- [inaudible] >> california is america if we don't change. that's a scary thought. you can see the future, just look to california. it should scare everybody in america. no one would want to go the. part of the answer of california is to stop trying to be the federal government. they can save a lot of money if they pull back from the own agencies and own regulations. but i do think we have this opportunity, to tom's point on this leg of the school got it all fits on a growth like if you will. because i think that we woul
years, we have had revenues coming into the federal government at a level around 15% of gdp. that is a 60-year low. since 1960, we have never had a balanced budget in a year when revenues were less than 18% of gdp. in 2001, the last year we had a surplus, revenues were at 19.5% of gdp. we have a revenue problem. we need tax reform to solve it. some on the left have suggested corporate tax reform could be a source for new revenue but here i disagree. to preserve our international competitiveness, it is imperative we seek to reduce the corporate rate from 35% and do it on a revenue-neutral basis. this will boost growth and encourage more companies to reinvest in the united states. corporate tax reform, under the leadership of chairman baucus senator hatch should be treated separately from our attempt to get a handle on the deficit. but when it comes to the individual side of the code, our approach must be different. in this part of reform, the new money we collect from broadening the tax base cannot all be applied to prepare -- to reducing rates or else we will not get enough
government, but hesitated to make decisions and were forced to rely upon local and tribal militias of varying degrees of loyalty. in late spring, the police were allowed to return to work to help with traffic, but were limited to that only. fighting between militias was common. militias separated -- they appeared to be disintegrating into freelance criminal operations. targeted attacks against westerners were increasing. in june, the ambassador received a threat on facebook with a public announcement he would like to run around the embassy compound in tripoli. when i arrived in february, three teams were on the ground. ambassador katz was forced -- lost one of his teams. the ambassador struggled with renewing the sst beyond april 5. that is ambassador stevens. the second msd team was withdrawn after the departure of critz. restricted from performing security work only and limited only to train local guard force members in july. the remaining msd was withdrawn at the same time the sst was terminated. the security in benghazi was a struggle and remained a struggle throughout my time there. the
does now. if you think about liberia it was the women coming together and it was without government sank and without our own encouragement. so it needs to be a true component in our foreign policy. we need to see this as fundamental and act is if it's fundamental. and of course in afghanistan, you know, i mean thanks to the feminist majority that was concern about the women in afghanistan but i can tell you the administration was saying it's their culture. i think maybe what happens to women is culture, what happens to men is politics. you can't change that. and we now have the very deep and important problem of how we leave and what happens. [applause]. >> i invite any of our members of the press and the feminist media who have joined us today to also jump in. it's a question now about girls and young women who want to make a difference for women's rights and in feminism, do you have advice for them? >> my advice is don't listen to me. really, listen to yourself. that's the whole idea. we're here to support you and learn from you. no relationship is unequal including between young
and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they're going to have to go back and authorized congress for more trillions of dollars of borrowing. the republicans and lots of people in congress don't want to authorize that. so there is going to be a bloody negotiation, unless they can work a deal. in a sense, this is a book about the past, but it's about the present. it is about where we are going and what the country's future is. if you think about it i would argue that the inability of the government to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president b
working for our government needs to have protection, and that is an abject failure and that should be a big thing in this election. a chocolates look at mitt romney's comments yesterday in virginia -- host: let's look at mitt romney put the comments just in virginia. [video clip] >> the attacks on america should not be seen as random act. they are a larger struggle that is played out over the middle east, a region that is in the midst of the most profound upheaval in a century. the fault lines of this struggle can be seen in benghazi. the attack on our consulate on september 11, 2012, was likely the work of forces affiliated with those that affect our homeland on september 11, 2001. the latest result can not be blamed on a reprehensible video, despite the administration's attempts to convince us of that. the administration has finally conceded these attacks were the deliver work of terrorists they use violence to impose their ideology on others and who seek to wage perpetual war on the west. guest: it is interesting. on the one hand, mitt romney was criticized for his initial respo
? is there a point where the federal government seizes control of the project? dr. ruiz? >> thank you for bringing this up, because it really brings very pleasant memories of my father taking me there to fish and havin picnics with the family. now we're seeing dead fish and a stink that is unbearable. and this is somewhere where congresswoman has failed to deliver. she continues to talk a big game. she promised in her first election that she would fix the sea. 14 years later it has not been fixed. i don't know what stippings more, a broken promise or the sultan sea. in fact, this is a great opportunity right now for us to revive that sultan sea so that we can have it as a hot spot for tourism, so that other children can fish with their fairs, so we can develop geothermal energy and boost our economy. and the way we're going to go about doing it is public/private partnerships with local input and authority so that we can come together and stop this bickering and attack talk and all this other stuff that congresswoman bono mack is so adept at and skilled, but really come up with some problem-solving
needed the u.s. government and we were in a position to tell the banks, let's go back to the social function, very important social functions. the banks have to provide in our society. and we lost that moment. >> rose: and the condition of the banks today is, of the big banks in wall street. >> well, to be frank, we really aren't sure because there's not the kind of transparency that we need. like one of my criticisms of dodd frank, we kept a lot of, for instance, these derif deriff-- derivative transparents. >> they made them a lit bit more. >> but as long as you have so much money at stake where you don't know what is at risk, you know, let me just give you one example. there are about 3 to 350 trillion dollars of derivatives that are based on libor. libor we now know is a-- number. >> explain what that is. >> the london interbank lending rate. so it's the rate, supposed to be an arm's length rate at which unone bank lends to each other. but the banks aren't lend fog each other s so what does it mean? it's a concept-- what rate do we think some other bank would lend to us. and we
objects to. there is no role for the government to be sort of people by race. >> the university of texas of austin's has what? guest: they say the supreme court has endorsed education and diversity as a compelling goal for the government and an exception to the usual rule that the government should not be classified people by race. it is true, and a 5-4 decision, the supreme court said that, but the key vote, sandra day o'connor, has retired, replaced by a more conservative judge, samuel alito, so in that they give us a new result. >> what is the result of this, who will hear it, who will decide? guest: only eight justices will decide. elena kagan is reduced from oregon and the case as a former u.s. solicitor general. it is a good bet the four more conservative justices, if not to strike an entirely, will limit the use of race. the three more liberal ones will go the other way. as usual, anthony kennedy will hold the deciding vote. on the one hand, he has said there have been some positive things about the importance of diversity. on the other hand, he has never voted to make sure that a
, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of them designed to help children and the poor. >> the bombing in oakland the city has focused renewed attention on the rhetoric that's been coming from the right and those who cater to angry white men. although no one is suggesting right wing greater jocks approve of violence, the extent to which the approach fosters violence is being questioned by many observers. >> i don't think i think jesse jones defenders here. >> not me. i think you have to be worried about that's what's going on in the good lord's mind, because if there's retributive justice, he will get aids from a transfusion or one of his grandchildren will get it. >> it finally dawned on me that the person can start has reminded me of facially all this time was heinrich himmler, including his glasses. >> this advice, mr. bush, shut the hell up, good night and good luck. >> they have waved signs liking president obama to hitler and the devil can raise questions about whether he was really born in this country, falsely accuse him of planning to set up dead panels -- deat
, kentucky, east of here tomorrow. this is a fundamental discussion about the role of government. mitt romney in that debate the other week used the phrase "trickle-down government," which is a very clever and very condescending formulation of what government is. the government programs that we have, that include social security and medicare and medicaid and education and so forth come from the ground up. they're what people want, they're what people need, they're what people voted for. they're part of the fabric of american life. they're not trickle-down anything. and what the president has to do and what joe biden has to do tomorrow night is to confront that notion. joe biden has to not only defend the president and attack paul ryan for his libertarian ideas, joe biden has to defend social security and medicare and the very idea of the usefulness and the importance of government in sharing responsibility in america, a big, heavy lift for joe biden tomorrow night. >> it's a heavy lift, howard, i agree, but it's also right in his wheelhouse. everyone in this country knows his middle class bac
to go up again. our information services and the government. gentlemen, we are out of time. we appreciate your time on the "washington journal." house of representatives is coming into session. a pro forma session. there will be no real business done today. thank you for being with us. enjoy your weekend. book tv begins on c-span 2 at 8:00 a.m. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. october 12, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable scott desjarlais to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. sage: the prayer will be offered by the guest chap lip, dr. david r-l r. roberry institute of the religion of the church of jesus christ of latter-day saints, washington, d.c. the chaplain: let us pray. dear father in heaven, humbly we bow before thee, recognizing our dependence upon thee and seeking thy guidance in the proceedings of this, the people's house. father, we express profound gratitude that thou has established our constitution by the hands
to the cyber threat requires the right policies and organizations across the federal government. for the past year, the department of defense has been working closely with other agencies to understand where are the lines of responsibility when it comes to cyber defense? where do we draw those lines? how do those responsibilities get executed? as part of that effort, the department is now finalizing the most comprehensive change to our rules of engagement in cyberspace in seven years. the new rules will make clear that the department has a responsibility not only to be thin d.o.d.'s networks -- to networks, but to defend the nation and our natural -- national interests in cyberspace. these new rules makes the department more agile and provides us with the ability to confront major threats quickly. to execute these responsibilities, we must have strong organizational structures in place. three years ago, the department took a major step forward by establishing the united states cyber command. under the leadership of a four start officer who also served as the director of the national security a
and whether they matter. first, the world section of usa today, testimony before the house government and oversight committee -- recovered yesterday's hearing. if your interested in watching, go to our web site c-span.org to get more. in the "washington times" this morning -- these e-mails were obtained by the washington times. and an update on a story we told you about yesterday, a high court hearing oral arguments about the affirmative action case. the university of texas at austin being challenged by abigail fisher about how they admit their students. this is what richard wolfe and mary beth write -- if you are interested in the audio of the oral arguments, it will be released by the court on friday after 1:00 p.m. c-span.org to find out when we will be airing that on friday. jimmy is an independent scholar. where are you from? caller: north carolina. host: what do you think about the vice-presidential debate? caller: well, i think the vice presidential debate matters. the politics have become like a consumer item in how we package the product and substance does not really matter.
in return is by and large good government. and we do find it. we have research and studies that have gone into that. there's also the question of corporate money which was pointed out, everybody but super pacs would be funded by corporate money. that is cloudy not the case. it's almost all individual money. albeit from very wealthy individuals. there's not a strong reason to think is mostly corporate money, especially not large corporate publicly traded corporations. what we have to ultimately is a couple of questions. there's one question, which is is a good or bad habits more open deregulate system where everybody can kind of play the game? the second question is the one kim keeps trying to drag us back to is how much of this do we need more disclosure of this because some of this activity is not disclosed? i will note that 501(c)(4) organizations have always been able to participate in politics and it never had to disclose their donors. i take, sort of my starting point, my perception of the government better have a darn good reason before source keeping a database in which it catalogs
. >> do you think this attack on malala might help the pakastani government have the political will to take on the taliban? >> i just heard that the ministry and the minister of the interior are hoping this will give them the will to move the bank that has not happened and needs to happen if pakistan is to have an effective counterterrorism policy. >> are you worried that the american condemnation of the attack on malala could prove counterproductive when you are trying to help? >> we are not the only ones condemning. even those who are anti-american are condemning the attack. it may reverberate most negatively against one candidate for president, but he has held back from condemning the taliban himself for a reason that i think is very interesting. he says he is afraid they would retaliate against his workers in the region. that shows you the deaths of the year and intimidation that just a handful -- the death of the fear and intimidation that just a handful of terrorists have. they hate the teheran and fever and the attacking of innocent -- they hate the terror and fear and t
. the protection against government sponsorship and promotion of religion, which is a vital component of religious liberty. i will just say a few words about where we are today and where we used to be. they are important right next to each other. as for the separation of church and state, the protection against government sponsorship of religion there was little and today it is far more robust, but absent flows and a lot of that depends on the current competition and chemistry of the supreme court and the rest of the federal court in state courts as well. but a while back there was virtually none. i think there is a great deal more of that protection today. it is very much in jeopardy. on the free exercise side, it is never been particularly robust in this country, unfortunately. and i think it is very fortunate. today it is a mixed bag. in 1990, the supreme court severely limited the constitutional protection for free exercise in the way that i think probably all of us at this table think was wrong. and since then, there have been legislative efforts to correct the problem. what the court said ba
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 250 (some duplicates have been removed)

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